WORSHIP WITH US!
8:30AM, 9:45AM in the hall, or 11AM

Location:
7150 Pines Blvd
Pembroke Pines, FL 33024
The SE corner of Pines Blvd and 72nd Ave
Across the street from Broward college South Campus lake
(954) 989-1903
tlcppines@gmail.com


Join Us For Worship!

Join Us For Worship!
Sundays at 8:30AM, 9:45AM, and 11AM

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott


Pastor will be preaching on Mark 11:20-13: 27.  The lectionary readings for Sunday, March 4, 2012:


First Reading: Genesis 17:1-7, 15-16

Psalm: Psalm 22:22-30 (Psalm 22:23-31 NRSV)

Second Reading: Romans 4:13-25

Gospel: Mark 8:31-38


In today's Gospel, Jesus gives us fairly stark terms about what it means to be a Christian, and the passage that Pastor Keith has chosen shows Christ living this life as it comes to the end that Jesus forecasts earlier when talking to the disciples in Mark 8.

The question of what it means to follow Christ is worth thinking about, in our world where Christianity has become so distorted and used to justify so many questionable activities.

Over the last 50 or so years of the 20th century, many people came to see Christianity as just one more way to self-enlightenment or self-improvement. Many people combined Christian practices with Eastern practices, and most of them showed that they had precious little knowledge of either.

Or worse, people seemed to see Christianity as a path to riches. We see this in countless stories of pastors who took money from parishioners and, instead of building housing for homeless people, built mansions for themselves. We see this in the megachurch which is held up as an optimum model, the yardstick by which we smaller churches are measured and come up lacking. The bestseller lists are full of books which promise a Christian way to self-fulfillment or riches, while books of sturdy theology will never be known by most readers.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer is one of a multitude of theologians who warns us against this kind of thinking, of what Christianity can do for us. He calls it cheap grace, this salvation that doesn't require us to change our comfortable lives (or worse, tells us to expect more comfort). He says, "Cheap grace is the preaching of forgiveness without requiring repentance, baptism without church discipline, communion without confession, absolution without personal confession. Cheap grace is grace without discipleship, grace without the cross, grace without Jesus Christ, living and incarnate. Costly grace is the gospel which must be sought again and again, the gift which must be asked for, the door at which a person must knock" (A Testament to Freedom 308).

Jesus reminds us again and again that Christians are to strive NOT to put themselves at the center of their lives. Taking our Christian lives seriously is sure to put us on a collision course with the larger world. Christ warns us that we may even lose our lives. I suspect that he means this on several different levels, yet it is worth reminding ourselves of how many martyrs there have been, even in the late-twentieth century, people who were murdered because they dared to take Christianity seriously and called on corrupt governments to change their practices or went to places where the rest of us are afraid to go to help the poor of the world.

If we don't put ourselves at the center of our lives (and what a countercultural idea that is!), then who should be there? Many of us deny ourselves for the good of our children, for our charity work, for our bosses. Yet that's not the right answer either.

God requires that we put God at the center of our lives. Frankly, many of us are much better at putting our children first or our students or our friends--but God? Many of us are mystified at how we even begin to do that.

A good place to start is with prayer. You don't need a formal time to pray--just check in throughout the day. Go back to the practices that your parents probably tried to instill in you: say grace before meals, say your bedtime prayers, think about who could use God's assistance, and use your prayer time to remind God of those people. If you feel awkward, go back to old standards, like saying the Lord's Prayer or reading a Psalm.

Make God a daily and a weekly priority: go to church services. Lent gives you the opportunity to experience different kinds of services. Take advantage of these.

Once God is at the center of your life, then you are more well-equipped to care for the world. We are not emotionally equipped to deal with the cares of the world, especially now that we have 24 hour reporting on every catastrophe that happens. But with God at our core, we can cope.

Sunday, February 26, 2012


REFLECTING ON OUR FAITH
 “Reflecting on Our Faith” is a sampled collection of reflections left and written by worshippers at Trinity Lutheran, Pembroke Pines, on their Sunday morning worship slips based upon their experiences during the previous week. We share a sampling of these in our weekly BLOG and elsewhere to encourage others in their walk with God; however, names and other information referenced in the reflections are abbreviated or deleted altogether in order to maintain anonymity.

1. Where have you seen God working this week?
At Trinity in the giving of myself to the lord
Blooms on mango tree
My mom and grandma as they tackle a new phase in their life.
At Calvary Chapel Celebrate Recovery 12 Step
Helping me in my sorrow.
I finally got to the neurologist after several problems
Healing for a few friends this week.
Coming to the 8AM service

2. Where Did God use someone else to bless you this week (whether they knew it or not)?
At Trinity in greeting others and those who bless me.
Someone took my to lunch
My girls’ love!
At Trinity’s Ash Wednesday Service
My sisters in Christ helped me accept that I need not feel bad for dong God’s work even if it hurts.
Someone took me to lunch and someone gave me a ride home ASH WED.
By interceding in the physical and emotional recovery of a friend who is having a slow knee replacement recovery.

3. Where did God use you to bless someone else this week?
At my aftercare group.
Invited a couple to attend this worship service.
Talked with a new elderly neighbor.
Small group meetings at Bible Study at Trinity Lutheran Church
Drove a family to church for ASH WED service and drove someone else home.
Praying for a friend
Giving me the strength to help my recovering friend who is in much discomfort.

HOW HAS TRINITY HELPED SUSTAIN YOU IN YOUR FOLLOWING OF CHRIST IN THE WORLD?
Being more disciplined in my morals and values as God speaks to me.
Has it? Absolutely!
Learning during the Trinity Adult Bible Study
The ASH WED service strengthened my faith.
Pastor’s welcoming ways
Sam’s warmth and caring.
People in the congregation who are all extensions of God’s loving ways.
By preaching the words of Christ and his love for all people!
SERMON
New sermon for Lent Week One posted at http://youtu.be/z7vQxZYYD3g

GODSPA
GODSPA Information meeting with Piper this coming Sunday, March 4 at 12:15PM in the hall following the second worship service. All planning on attending Godspa or desiring more information should plan on attending this info meeting!

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Meditation on Gospels for Sunday

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott

Throughout the season of Lent, Pastor Keith will be talking about the last week of Jesus.  The lectionary Gospel takes us back to the beginning of the ministry of Jesus, which foreshadows the last week.

The lectionary readings for Sunday, February 26, 2012

First Reading: Genesis 9:8-17

Psalm: Psalm 25:1-9 (Psalm 25:1-10 NRSV)

Second Reading: 1 Peter 3:18-22

Gospel: Mark 1:9-15

In today’s Gospel, we see Christ going through the stages of the life of a Christian, in a sort of fast-forward filmstrip: baptism, wilderness/desert time of desolation and doubt, temptation, death of mentors, carrying on with life’s work anyway. Why should we, thousands of years later, think that life will be any different for us?

Think about the sacrament of Baptism. We do not get the water and the word because we’ve proven ourselves. As Lutherans, many of us get the water and the word when we’re babies. In today’s Gospel, Jesus, too, is just a baby of sorts. God proclaims love for Jesus even before Jesus has done anything substantial. God is pleased with Jesus before his ministry even begins.

Many of us struggle with the concept of grace. I spend a lot of time trying to explain to non-believers how it is possible for so many Christians to be so hypocritical. My answer: “Because we’re human, and we can’t always behave in the best way possible.” That answer doesn’t usually satisfy my human interrogators. How lucky we are that God is not so judgmental. God knows we will fail, but God loves us anyway. God knows we cannot ever be good enough, but God doesn’t use that concept as a battering ram to promote more self-loathing. No, God loves us, even though we don’t deserve it.

Even with the gift of God’s grace, life will not be perfect for us. Jesus shows us that there will be wilderness times in every life. If the Son of God isn't exempt, why should we expect that we will be? Mark tells us that Jesus was driven into the wilderness, where he was tempted by Satan and the angels ministered to him.

Notice Mark's spare storytelling style. It will be up to later Gospel writers to tell us the nature of the temptations. Mark seems to say that the temptation in its particulars is not important. Satan tempts Jesus. We will be tempted. And many of us will be so out of touch, we won't even realize we're being tempted. We're so good at rationalizing that we won't even realize that Satan has been successful with us. In her book, Real Sex: The Naked Truth about Chastity, Lauren F. Winner reminds us, "This is how sin works: it whispers to us about the goodness of something not good. It makes distortions feel good" (89).

Look at the end of the Gospel lesson: John the Baptist has been arrested. We can't say we haven't been warned about what might happen to us when we do God's work in the world.

But we're not excused from doing it. The Gospel ends with Jesus continuing his mission, preaching the gospel of God.

Lent is a time of spiritual conditioning. Some people fast or give up a favorite food or beverage. Some people add a spiritual discipline, like another period of prayer or additional Bible reading. Some people try to limit the activities, like Internet meandering or gossip, that take them further away from God. Lent is a season that can fortify us to for the Christian life, so that we’re ready for wilderness times and persecution and the work that must be done anyway.

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

THE DISCIPLINE OF LENT
We'll be making voluntary Lenten Commitments tonight! Let us enter into the discipline of Lent and deeper into the presence of Christ! There will be a second opportunity on Sunday for those unable to attend this evening's service.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

SUGGESTIONS FOR LENT
Get into God’s word. You could….
Join the “Lenten Reflection Team” by choosing one or more of the 33 readings from the Passion According to the Gospel of Mark (Mark 11-15).

1. The list of possible readings is available in the narthex or you may request them by email from Pastor Keith
2. Read it; Reflect upon it; Write about it.
3. These question may help you in writing about the text. Feel free to use them (or not.)
• What does your reading mean to you?
• What surprises you in the text? Moves you?
• Intrigues you? Challenges you?
• What do you want to know more about?
• What confuses you?
• What stories of your life does it bring to your conscious memory?
• What might the Holy Spirit through the text be inviting you to do?
4. You can write as little or as much as you desire.
5. We invite you (not required) to share your reflection by submitting it to Pastor Keith who may share them with the Trinity community in various ways.

Get into God’s word
You could….
1. Make the commitment to have your children and youth attend Trinity’s Christian education classes Sunday mornings at 9:30AM
2. Participate in the Adult Sunday school class Sundays at 9:30AM – NO PREVIOUS BIBLE STUDY EXPERIENCE NEEDED!
3. Participate in the Tuesday morning Bible study with Earline LaCroix at 8:30AM
4. Participate in the Monthly WELCA (Women) and Men’s Group study and fellowship – March 13th & April 10th at 7:30PM
5. Participate in the “Prayer and Praise” Wednesday evenings at 6PM led by Earline LaCroix with music by Jacob Smitter

Try A Lenten Discipline.
1. Commit to Pray daily
2. Commit to spend time each day in Scripture
3. Commit to Worship weekly
4. Commit to attend Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter worship in order to experience Holy Week in its entirety.
5. Commit to Practice generosity each day
6. Commit to Invite someone to worship with you each week
7. Commit to Fast from something that distracts you from God whether that is Facebook or over-committing to activities or not being able to put aside work or television or worry or fear or anger or something else.
8. Commit to Practice thankfulness each day
9. Commit to reading a book that nurtures your faith or deepens your spirituality
10. Commit to Sabbath taking by setting aside time each week to do that which brings you the most joy
11. Commit to doing a work of love each day

Try Something Different.
1. Assist in worship or encourage your child/youth to assist in worship. If you or your child/youth is willing to learn the position, anyone is permitted to serve in any position as they feel called. (Sign up lists go around most Sundays)
2. Sing in the Easter Cantata Choir that rehearses Wednesday evenings at 7PM (See Jacob Smitter)
3. Participate in BOLD Justice events on March 22nd and April 26th (See Janean Baumal)
4. Go with Trinity to Feed the Hungry dinner at 1st Lutheran on March 7th or April 4th (See Jeanne Myers)
5. Help out with our Church-based Shelter Program Week March 5th-9th (See Lisa Miller)
6. Come out to a Church Yard Day or Butterfly Garden Day March 3rd and April 7th at 9:30AM
7. Knit a Prayer Shawl (See SAM Newton)
8. Try Yoga Thursday mornings at 9:30AM (See Diane Jansen)
9. Give Blood on April 1st and save three lives!
10. Become a part of the Tuesday morning craft group Tuesday mornings at 9:30AM (See Earline LaCroix)
11. Collect food for the Trinity food pantry


Like good stewards of the manifold grace of God,
serve one another with whatever gift
each of you has received
1 Peter 4:10
LENT, HOLY WEEK , AND EASTER
Trinity Lutheran Church, Pembroke Pines

ASH WEDNESDAY

7AM Imposition of Ashes
Noon Imposition of Ashes with Holy Communion
7PM Pre-Service Music
7:30PM Imposition of Ashes with Holy Communion
(ASH WED PANCAKE SUPPER 6PM to 7:30PM)


SUNDAYS IN LENT 8AM and 10:45AM
JESUS’ “LAST WEEK”
ACCORDING TO THE GOSPEL OF MARK

FEB 26th 1st Sunday in Lent Mark 11:12-19
March 4th 2nd Sunday in Lent MARK 11:20-13:37*
March 11th 3rd Sunday in Lent MARK 14:1-11
March 18th 4th Sunday in Lent MARK 14:12-72
March 25TH 5thSUNDAY IN LENT MARK 15

PALM SUNDAY APRIL 1st
8AM Holy Communion with Procession of Palms and the Reading of the Passion Gospel
10:45AM Holy Communion with “The Cry of the Whole Congregation”
A Dramatic Presentation of Christ’s Passion

HOLY WEEK
APRIL 5th MAUNDY THURSDAY
NOON Holy Communion Service with Washing of Feet or Hands
7:30PM Holy Communion with Foot/Hand Washing, and the Stripping of the Altar.
APRIL 6th GOOD FRIDAY
NOON: Service of Tenebrae with Adoration of the Cross
NOON to 3PM Self-Guided Stations of the Cross at the Prayer Labyrinth
7:30PM Service of Tenebrae and Adoration of the Cross with Trinity’s Worship Choir providing vocal and instrumental support

APRIL 8th EASTER SUNDAY
6:30AM Outdoor Sunrise with Candle Lighting and Holy Communion
9:30AM Easter Morning Family Service with Holy Communion
11AM Cantata Service of Holy Communion
(EASTER BREAKFAST 7:30AM to 10AM)

APRIL 15th SUNDAY AFTER EASTER
8AM SERVICE
Sunday After Easter with Holy Communion
10:45AM SERVICE
Cantata Service of Holy Communion (reprise)

APRIL 22nd TOGETHER IN MISSION SUNDAY 8AM and 10:45AM

BOLD Justice Issue Work Update

Education – Reading in Elementary

· 28 schools in Broward County have less than 55% of their kids reading at grade level

· 59% of all 1st year students entering Florida Colleges require reading remediation – remediation that costs the State of Florida $70 million a year

· Research based educational strategies exist that have been shown to raise the scores in underperforming schools

· We need to make sure that our schools are using educational strategies that have been proven effective

Reading Summit

“If you can Read – You Will Succeed!”

· Purpose: Review the current status of reading in Broward County – engage our congregations in understanding how to deal with this critical problem

· When: Saturday, February 25th; 10am – 12:00pm

· Where: City of Lauderdale Lakes Library: 3580 W Oakland Park, Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33311

· Plan to attend – With your help we can make sure all our kids can read!


For more information, contact Janean Baumal

LATEST SERMON AUDIO POSTED
http://youtu.be/fFHyKq7XSLo

Friday, February 17, 2012

REMINDER!
Beignet-A-Palooza is this Sunday!
12:15PM.
Beignets, Mardi gras trinkets, and more!
Bring a friend and come as we prepare ourselves for Lent!

Mark 9:2–9





Transfiguration Sunday 2012

1. Today is a tale of two mountains – one we see clearly and the other lurks in the background. The Mount of Transfiguration right before us and Golgotha – the Mount of his Crucifixion. The place of Jesus’ death off in the far distance.  



2. The Mount of Transfiguration is the place of mystery; a place where God’s voice is heard, God speaks to us and points us again to Jesus, God’s Son, the Beloved. Like Peter we want to build some houses and just camp there forever. God is there and there is nothing else to distract us, nothing else to do but watch and listen and experience God’s presence in and through Jesus. I mean, where else would we want to be?



3. As an older teen, church camp was like that for me. And after my first summer, even a head on collision that totaled my mom’s 72 Chevy station wagon and left me, the driver, sore and bruised and a bit dazed, could not keep me from attending. After that week up in the mountains, after faith stirring experience after faith stirring experience, we wept when we had to leave – older teenage boys bawling uncontrollably (though trying to hide their eyes from the teenage girls standing next to us) . We never wanted to leave that mountain. We wanted to freeze time itself and allow the holy light of Christ itself to warm our soul for endless moment upon endless moment.



4. The second mountain isn’t as obvious - but it lurks behind the entire story. Why did Jesus climb that mountain? Was it so he could spend time with God in prayer upon a sacred and holy place? Perhaps. But let me ask you this - What are Moses and Elijah doing there? Talking to Jesus. Not talking about the weather, either, we imagine. Or his inability to choose disciples who prefer ministry to sleeping. No. We know what awaits Jesus and we imagine that so do they: His suffering; His crucifixion; His death. At the hill called Golgotha. The place of mocking, of suffering, of abandonment. Of death.  It is the Mountain of Psalm 22 which Jesus will quote in some of the last words that he will speak:

My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?

The psalm continues
Why are you so far from helping me, from the words of my groaning? 2O my God, I cry by day, but you do not answer;
and by night, but find no rest.

Have you ever been to that mountain?



5. Golgotha is the place where God seems so far off it is as if God moved and forgot to leave a forwarding address. I remember visiting a woman in her final days who was dying at home under hospice care. She felt abandoned by God because she had abandoned God in her youth and never returned By the time of my visit her final days had been with fear and fixed by uncertainty.

Have you visited this mountain? Experienced a moment where God seemed so far off, beyond your sight? It can be a very difficult place to be. Alone. Unsure. Uncertain. Even though we know the promise of God that God is especially with us in this place, on this mountain, yet sometimes our faith has trouble comprehending it. Like the man seeking Jesus’ help we shout “I believe! Help my unbelief!”  



6. Most of life is often lived somewhere in between – in the valley. And the valley is a place of great temptation. On one mountain, God seems perfectly present. And on the other God seems perfectly absent (though again, God is in truth  especially present). But in the valley we face the temptation to not care either way. To simply not care. To be indifferent. To even make up our own gods as we need them like when Moses goes up a Mountain while below the people force Aaron to make for them other gods whom they could see and then they party – and in the end it doesn’t get them very far.] Sometimes people make up their own gods, too, as Martin Luther tells us, “that to which our heart clings is our god” and we may find many things for which our heart might cling to get us through the day, through the difficult times, to lose ourselves in something, anything. The valley is a place of great temptation.


7. The valley is also where are churches have their existence, too. Oh, we like to think that they are up there on the first mountain – hanging out with Moses and Elijah and Jesus and taking in the awesome voice of God. But churches, they live in the valley. Where they face temptations, too. The temptation to forget whose church they truly are – to have a crisis of pronouns  - “This is my church!” they shout, forgetting that it is Christ’s church, built upon his body, his gift, his grace. And if we believe that it is our church then we fall into the temptation to put ourselves first as we make decisions. If it is Christ’s church, then we seek to do his will, which according to scripture usually involves serving the other and giving oneself away. In the valley there is always a great temptation to believe that what belongs to Jesus really belongs to us.



8. In the valley we as both individuals and congregations may also fall into the temptation of just keeping busy, of trying to do good, of keeping busy doing lots of good things, but these are not an acceptable substitute for the radical life of faith to which we are called. The Christian faith is not about just trying to keep busy being good people. In Christ we have become new creations! In Christ everything old has passed away and we have been make new and called to be ambassadors for Christ proclaiming in words and deed the Good News of Salvation, and embodying the in-breaking Kingdom of God in our lives. A Kingdom of justice, of compassion, of reconciliation, of hope that carts out fear, of a faith that will not disappoint us. This is not just about trying to be good people living good lives.  


9. But look beyond the next hill. Past Golgotha dawn is breaking. Can you see it: The rays of light divided into in colors beyond comprehension, that defy description?  



10. We are a people of already, but not yet. Easter has come and will come. But first a time to help us see, to hear, to discipline ourselves, a time of returning, to open our hearts, to allow us time to remember our own humility, our recall our total dependence upon God, to see the unfolding love of God embracing us and the world.

The season of Lent awaits us here in the valley. It is time to leave the first mountain and take the journey before us. AMEN!

Thursday, February 16, 2012

SUGGESTIONS FOR LENT
Get into God’s word. You could….
Join the “Lenten Reflection Team” by choosing one or more of the 33 readings from the Passion According to the Gospel of Mark (Mark 11-15).

1. The list of possible readings is available in the narthex or you may request them by email from Pastor Keith
2. Read it; Reflect upon it; Write about it.
3. These question may help you in writing about the text. Feel free to use them (or not.)
• What does your reading mean to you?
• What surprises you in the text? Moves you?
• Intrigues you? Challenges you?
• What do you want to know more about?
• What confuses you?
• What stories of your life does it bring to your conscious memory?
• What might the Holy Spirit through the text be inviting you to do?
4. You can write as little or as much as you desire.
5. We invite you (not required) to share your reflection by submitting it to Pastor Keith who may share them with the Trinity community in various ways.

Get into God’s word
You could….
1. Make the commitment to have your children and youth attend Trinity’s Christian education classes Sunday mornings at 9:30AM
2. Participate in the Adult Sunday school class Sundays at 9:30AM – NO PREVIOUS BIBLE STUDY EXPERIENCE NEEDED!
3. Participate in the Tuesday morning Bible study with Earline LaCroix at 8:30AM
4. Participate in the Monthly WELCA (Women) and Men’s Group study and fellowship – March 13th & April 10th at 7:30PM
5. Participate in the “Prayer and Praise” Wednesday evenings at 6PM led by Earline LaCroix with music by Jacob Smitter

Try A Lenten Discipline.
1. Commit to Pray daily
2. Commit to spend time each day in Scripture
3. Commit to Worship weekly
4. Commit to attend Maundy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter worship in order to experience Holy Week in its entirety.
5. Commit to Practice generosity each day
6. Commit to Invite someone to worship with you each week
7. Commit to Fast from something that distracts you from God whether that is Facebook or over-committing to activities or not being able to put aside work or television or worry or fear or anger or something else.
8. Commit to Practice thankfulness each day
9. Commit to reading a book that nurtures your faith or deepens your spirituality
10. Commit to Sabbath taking by setting aside time each week to do that which brings you the most joy
11. Commit to doing a work of love each day

Try Something Different.
1. Assist in worship or encourage your child/youth to assist in worship. If you or your child/youth is willing to learn the position, anyone is permitted to serve in any position as they feel called. (Sign up lists go around most Sundays)
2. Sing in the Easter Cantata Choir that rehearses Wednesday evenings at 7PM (See Jacob Smitter)
3. Participate in BOLD Justice events on March 22nd and April 26th (See Janean Baumal)
4. Go with Trinity to Feed the Hungry dinner at 1st Lutheran on March 7th or April 4th (See Jeanne Myers)
5. Help out with our Church-based Shelter Program Week March 5th-9th (See Lisa Miller)
6. Come out to a Church Yard Day or Butterfly Garden Day March 3rd and April 7th at 9:30AM
7. Knit a Prayer Shawl (See SAM Newton)
8. Try Yoga Thursday mornings at 9:30AM (See Diane Jansen)
9. Give Blood on April 1st and save three lives!
10. Become a part of the Tuesday morning craft group Tuesday mornings at 9:30AM (See Earline LaCroix)
11. Collect food for the Trinity food pantry


Like good stewards of the manifold grace of God,
serve one another with whatever gift
each of you has received
1 Peter 4:10

LENT, HOLY WEEK , AND EASTER

ASH WEDNESDAY

7AM Imposition of Ashes
Noon Imposition of Ashes with Holy Communion
7PM Pre-Service Music
7:30PM Imposition of Ashes with Holy Communion
(ASH WED PANCAKE SUPPER 6PM to 7:30PM)


SUNDAYS IN LENT 8AM and 10:45AM
JESUS’ “LAST WEEK”
ACCORDING TO THE GOSPEL OF MARK

 FEB 26th 1st Sunday in Lent Mark 11:12-19
March 4th  2nd Sunday in Lent MARK 11:20-13:37*
March 11th            3rd Sunday in Lent MARK 14:1-11
March 18th            4th Sunday in Lent MARK 14:12-72
March 25TH            5th SUNDAY IN LENT  MARK 15

PALM SUNDAY APRIL 1st
8AM                Holy Communion with Procession of Palms and the Reading of the Passion Gospel
10:45AM        Holy Communion with “The Cry of the Whole Congregation”
A Dramatic Presentation of Christ’s Passion

HOLY WEEK
APRIL 5th       MAUNDY THURSDAY
NOON                        Holy Communion Service with Washing of Feet or Hands
7:30PM                      Holy Communion with Foot/Hand Washing, and the Stripping of the Altar.
APRIL 6th       GOOD FRIDAY
NOON:                       Service of Tenebrae with Adoration of the Cross
NOON to 3PM           Self-Guided Stations of the Cross at the Prayer Labyrinth
7:30PM                      Service of Tenebrae and Adoration of the Cross with Trinity’s Worship Choir providing vocal and instrumental support

APRIL 8th       EASTER SUNDAY
6:30AM                      Outdoor Sunrise with Candle Lighting and  Holy Communion
9:30AM                      Easter Morning Family Service with Holy Communion
11AM                          Cantata Service of Holy Communion
(EASTER BREAKFAST 7:30AM to 10AM)

APRIL 15th    SUNDAY AFTER EASTER          
8AM SERVICE
Sunday After Easter with Holy Communion
10:45AM SERVICE
Cantata Service of Holy Communion (reprise)

APRIL 22nd    TOGETHER IN MISSION SUNDAY 8AM and 10:45AM
Pastor Keith needs clean and unoccupied birdcages by FRI FEB 24th for use in a display during our LENT WEEK ONE Services on Sunday FEB 26. Anyone willing to lend us some? Please email Pastor Keith or leave a message at the office.

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott

The readings for Sunday, February 19, 2012:

First Reading: 2 Kings 2:1-12

Psalm: Psalm 50:1-6

Second Reading: 2 Corinthians 4:3-6

Gospel: Mark 9:2-9


I often approach Transfiguration Sunday by thinking about ways to transfigure myself. In just a few days, we enter the season of Lent, that season of ash and penitence. Lent gets us ready for the joy of Easter. Lent gives us the perfect opportunity for self-exploration, to analyze our behaviors and beliefs that keep us from being Resurrection People.

What do we need to transfigure ourselves? We could start with the basics: daily prayer (ideally several times a day), daily spiritual reading, weekly worship, tithing of our resources. We could surround ourselves with people who lead us to be our better selves, while we look for ways to help others be their best selves. We can be the path that helps other people find their way to God. We can practice radiating love. We can be the agents of God's transfiguring power.

You may say, "I can hardly get out of bed every morning, and now you want me to radiate love???" You may say, "I can hardly pay my bills and now I have to be the agent of God's transfiguring power?"

This year, I, too, find myself feeling exhausted. I think of adopting a Lenten discipline that says no to more activities. Instead of exploring a new spiritual discipline, as I have done in many past years, maybe I will say no to adding a new discipline to my schedule.

But before I get too busy rejecting all sorts of possibilities, maybe it’s good to return to the idea of transfiguration. How do I wish to be transfigured? What would make me glow with God’s goodness?

I’ve been reading Lauren Winner’s latest book, Still: Notes on a Mid-Faith Crisis, which explores the life of a woman who has made her living as a professional Christian of sorts who has a bit of a mid-faith crisis (for a complete review, go here). The part of the book that resonated most with me was her experiment with giving up anxiety. She tries ignoring her anxiety in 15 minute increments. She decides to pray when she feels anxious, sometimes praying the Jesus prayer ("Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner"), sometimes a prayer she finds in the back of a prayer book. She tries repeating the word "One" until the anxiety ebbs.

She's clear on why it's important to let go of the anxiety, quoting Francis de Sales: "The anxious heart, in its flailings, loses its hold on whatever graces God has bestowed upon it, and is sapped of the strength 'to resist the temptations of the Evil One, who is all the more ready to fish . . . in troubled waters'" (page 90).

I found myself underlining this part of the book more than any other, which makes me think that I still have work to do when it comes to anxiety. I say that I trust that God will provide for me, yet my anxiety shows that I’m not as transfigured as I wish to be.

Soon, we celebrate Ash Wednesday, a day that reminds us that we are here on this earth for a very short time. Rather than get morose about this subject, we can use this as a prompt to ask ourselves what's important in our lives. Are we living daily lives that are in sync with those values? How can we make adjustments to ensure that we are not wasting our brief time here?

God promises to transfigure our lives from dust and ash to living light. Again and again, God declares transfiguring love: not just for Jesus, but for all of us. In a world that rejects us in so many ways, it's good to remember that God claims us, every day. In God’s creation, every day is Transfiguration Sunday.

Monday, February 13, 2012

Sunday, February 12, 2012

BAKED APPLE FRENC TOAST
Also from the brunch
http://www.tasteofhome.com/Recipes/Baked-Apple-French-Toast

Baked Apple French Toast

 Baked Apple French Toast
“This is a simply wonderful brunch recipe that tastes special and will have your guests asking for seconds," promises Beverly Johnson of Rubicon, Wisconsin. "I serve it with whipped topping, maple syrup and additional nuts. Some people say it tastes good enough to be dessert!”
10 ServingsPrep: 20 min. + chilling Bake: 35 min.

Ingredients

  • 20 slices French bread (1 inch thick)
  • 1 can (21 ounces) apple pie filling
  • 8 eggs
  • 2 cups 2% milk
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • TOPPING:
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup cold butter, cubed
  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 2 tablespoons corn syrup

Directions

  • Arrange 10 slices of bread in a greased 13-in. x 9-in. baking dish.
  • Spread with pie filling; top with remaining bread. In a large bowl,
  • whisk the eggs, milk, vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg. Pour over bread.
  • Cover and refrigerate overnight.
  • Remove from the refrigerator 30 minutes before baking. Meanwhile,
  • place brown sugar in a small bowl. Cut in butter until mixture
  • resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in pecans and corn syrup. Sprinkle
  • over French toast.
  • Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 35-40 minutes or until a knife
  • inserted near the center comes out clean.
  • Yield: 10 servings.
Click here to find out more!
THANK YOU!!!!
To Dany Vega and her crew in setting up, serving, and cleaning up from the Valentine's Brunch today!
What an awesome time!

And for those who asked here are two of the recipes:

OVERNIGHT FRENCH TOAST (from cooks.com)
1 loaf French bread
5 eggs
¾ cup milk
¼ teaspoon baking powder
Nutmeg
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1 – 20OZ bag frozen strawberries
4 bananas
1 cup sugar.
Cut bread into 8 thick slices. Combine eggs, milk, baking powder and vanilla. Grease baking dish; place bread in dish. Pour egg mixture over bread. Cover and refrigerate overnight. In morning, combine strawberries, sliced bananas, sugar and nutmeg. Pour over bread. Bake in 450 degree oven for 20-25 minutes. Serves 8.
 
Breakfast Casserole (Emeril Lagasse)
 6 eggs
1 cup half and half
2 tablespoons green onions chopped
Salt and pepper
Butter to grease pans
6  - one inch thick slices of crusty white bread (I used French bread)
1 pound spicy or mild pork breakfast sausage
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
In a small bowl beat the eggs until they loosen up. Add the half and half and green onions. Mix well. Highly season with salt and pepper and set aside. Butter a 12x10 inch baking pan. Line the pan with the bread, cutting and rearranging the bread, if needed. Sprinkle the bread with the cooked sausage and cheese. Pour the egg mixture over the entire pan. Cover and refrigerate overnight. The next morning pre heat oven to 350 degrees. Cook covered for 25-30 minutes or until egg mixture is set.





Thursday, February 09, 2012

CHURCH DIRECTORY UPDATE
Proving, once again, that we are a resurrection people, the church directory project is moving forward under the supervision of Harry Furey. If you have never gotten your picture taken OR if you wish an updated picture taken, please either (1) post here (2) check the block on your Sunday Worship slip (3) Let SAM in the office know by email or call.
Based upon the responses we will either schedule a new shoot with the company or set up our own photo days and take the pictures ourselves. Deadline to let us know if you need a photo or an updated photo SUN FEB 25th

Wednesday, February 08, 2012

Justice Ministry Valentine’s Day Fundraiser

This Sunday after both services, the justice ministry will be selling all kinds of goodies for Valentine’s Day. Pick up your favorites for your special someone (or eat them yourself!) We’ll have yummy treats, carnations and balloons so come join us after your service in Charter Hall and share the love!

BEIGNET-A--PALOOZA IS COMING!TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 9th at 12:15PM
We'll show you how to make them and then someone will have to eat them. Will it be you?
We'll also have some Mardi Gras bead necklaces, ideas for renewing and deepening your faith during Lent, and more!
All welcome, especially friends!
For those who might desire the recipe:
Beignets
1 package active dry yeast
1 1/2 cups warm water (100 to 115 degrees F)
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon salt
2 large eggs
1 cup evaporated milk
7 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup vegetable  shortening
Oil for deep frying
Confectioners' sugar for dusting (or
    burying, depending on taste)
Put the warm water into a large bowl, then sprinkle in the yeast and a couple teaspoons of the sugar and stir until thoroughly dissolved. Let proof for 10 minutes.
Add the rest of the sugar, salt, eggs, and evaporated milk. Gradually stir in 4 cups of the flour and beat with a wooden spoon until smooth and thoroughly blended. Beat in the shortening, then add the remaining flour, about 1/3 cup at a time, beating it in with a spoon until it becomes too stiff to stir, then working in the rest with your hands. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight in a greased bowl.
Roll the dough out onto a floured board or marble pastry surface to a thickness of 1/8 inch, then cut it into rectangles 2 1/2 inches by 3 1/2 inches with a sharp knife.
Heat the oil in a deep fryer to 360 degrees F. Fry the beignets about 3 or 4 at a time until they are puffed out and golden brown on both sides, about 2-3 minutes per batch. Turn them over in the oil with tongs once or twice to get them evenly brown, since they rise to the surface of the oil as soon as they begin to puff out. Drain each batch, place on a platter lined with several layers of paper towels, and keep warm in a 200 degrees F oven until they're all done.
Serve 3 beignets per person, sprinkling heavily with powdered sugar, and serve hot with cafe au lait.