WORSHIP WITH US!
8:30AM, 9:45AM in the hall, or 11AM

Location:
7150 Pines Blvd
Pembroke Pines, FL 33024
The SE corner of Pines Blvd and 72nd Ave
Across the street from Broward college South Campus lake
(954) 989-1903
tlcppines@gmail.com


Join Us For Worship!

Join Us For Worship!
Sundays at 8:30AM, 9:45AM, and 11AM

Featured Post

Advent Meditation on Joseph

The reading for Sunday, December 17, 2017: Matthew 1:18-25 This Sunday we read about an angel appearing to Joseph in a dream. We've no...

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott

The readings for Sunday, June 3, 2012:


First Reading: Isaiah 6:1-8

Psalm: Psalm 29

Second Reading: Romans 8:12-17

Gospel: John 3:1-17


As we celebrate Holy Trinity Sunday on June 3, let us pause to consider the power of three. You probably learned from your Composition teachers that three main points have a greater chance of creating a solid essay; not one point, not two points, not seven, but three. If you've arranged objects on a mantel or a sideboard, you've probably noticed that three objects most often leads to balance; more looks cluttered, less looks sparse.

If you're a breadbaker, you've probably experimented with braids and twists. There's something beautiful about a braid of bread:




Consider the braid, how much stronger it is than the individual strand. You can easily pluck individual hairs out of a scalp. It's much harder to yank a braid of hair loose from the body.

We worship a God in three persons, as we commonly understand it; I have long suspected that our God contains multitudes, but our human brains can scarcely comprehend a God-in-three, much less a God-in-millions, so we stop at 3.

I have spent a lot of time thinking about communities of all sorts, and I love this idea of God as a communal God, God dwelling as 3-in-one. Throughout our Scriptures, we learn all sorts of lessons about community, and in the New Testament, we begin to perceive that God, too, dwells in community. And God who dwells in community invites us to be part of that community.

On Holy Trinity Sunday, we might spend some time thinking about all the aspects of God whom we've met: Creator, Mother, Redeemer, Savior, Fellow Traveler, Inspiration, Father, Breath,Mystic, Provider, Healer, Leader, Spiritual Director, Dreamer . . . the list could go on and on. Which incarnation of God speaks to you most?

Which incarnation do you need to invite to be part of your life?

Tuesday, May 29, 2012

REMINDER: WORSHIP THIS SUNDAY IS AT 11AM. ONE SERVICE AT 11AM.
That's 11AM : )

Voting on the 2012-2013 Budget/Spending Plan during worship.
Adult Bible Study at 10AM in Charter Hall with Pastor Keith.
All welcome.
Like, everyone. We even have Bibles for you.

VBS Team Meeting at 12:15PM in Charter Hall.
All VBS Volunteers please attend!

Monday, May 28, 2012

SUMMER Grace Groups
ACTS 2:42
They devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.

Hosts volunteer their homes, provide plates/tableware, and lead prayer/Scripture reflection for a total of 8 people including themselves. The other guests sign up to bring the different parts of the meal to share with those eight (Main course, sides, Salad, Drinks, Dessert)

Pastor Keith will provide the host with an easy Scripture discussion for after dinner time and suggestions for shared prayer. The host is asked to sign up ONE TIME for a date/time for dinner during to be held some time during the months of July or August.

Once the host sign up is complete, we will confirm with the hosts then open up the signups for those who desire to participate as guests.

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN SERVING AS A HOST PLEASE CHECK THE BLOCK ON YOUR WORSHIP SLIP
Temporary Custodian Needed
We are looking for someone to fill in as custodian while our regular custodian takes vacation July 1st - 20th. 10 hours a a week for 3 weeks at $9 an hour. Please check the box on your worship slip or let Pastor Keith know. DEADLINE IS SUNDAY  JUNE 10th.  Once the Personnel Committee makes a decision all those applying will be notified
TRINITY IN ONE WORD...
Trinity Lutheran described in one word by worshippers writing on their worship slips and accumulating such words this spring placed into a "Wordle"

Pentecost Sermon preached during our Confirmation Service May 27th 2012

Saturday, May 26, 2012


PENTECOST-CONFIRMATION SERMON 2012

When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place.  And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting.  Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them.  All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit

The congregation that I served during my seminary internship had a long and interesting history. In 1935, at its 50th anniversary, it was at risk of closing from ongoing decline, but they called a young pastor fresh out of seminary who turn things around – and a new spirit took hold in the congregation. After their first Easter Service together, after the last shout of “Christ is Risen!” echoed and folks went home to their turkey and their ham, a fire broke out in the organ and ruined the sanctuary. It was midway through the Great Depression and things looked bleak. On the front page of the local newspaper, where one expected words that summoned the pathos, the pain, the anguish, the hopelessness of a moment when everything seemed lost; there one expected news that their 50th anniversary would be their last, that this was the final nail in the coffin, that with the Great Depression crushing the spirits of people everywhere, that their spirits, too, had finally succumbed to the national numbness. However, what the pastor said when they quoted him went something like this: “We will rebuild. Christ is risen and the victory is already won.” 

Christ is risen and the victory is already won.

And they did rebuild. In the midst of the depression. When bank after bank turned them down for a loan. They persevered. Where a dying church once stood, from the smoldering ashes of a now destroyed sanctuary, the potential for ministry that touched the lives of thousands of people was released.

How could a small struggling congregation facing the loss of their sanctuary, facing, too, the challenges of the Great Depression, dare to declare Christ’s victory? Have the audacity to declare: Christ is risen and the victory is already won!

We need to go back to the first Pentecost. To the coming of the promised
Holy Spirit.
On that first Pentecost, Peter quotes the prophet Joel:
'In the last days it will be, God declares,
       that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh,
       and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy,
       and your young men shall see visions,
       and your old men shall dream dreams.

At first glance, I think that Spirit frightens us:
It frightens us because it is not comfortable.  It does not come in a box with instructions like some bookshelf from IKEA. It is moving, at work, inviting, challenging, asking for our creativity, our commitment, our trust, and defying our every attempt trying to make it do what we want to do, to go where we want to go, to serve only who we want to serve.

Think about that: The Spirit that fills us at Baptism and guides and sustains our faith is the Spirit that brooded over creation, that raised up the mountains and the oceans, that set the stars in the heavens; the Spirit that breathed into the first humans the breath of life, the very breath of God. It is that Spirit that gives all of us the power to stare into the eyes of hopelessness and declare Christ’s victory again and again.

Even as it gives us courage and fixes in our very souls a hope that can never be taken away from us, it frightens us. It frightens us because we do not know where it may lead us. What it will invite us to do. Who it will call us to embrace. How it might call us to change and change and change even as it transforms us and is always at the transforming us, calling us to new and deeper lives of faith.

Confirmation is an invitation to a deeper life of faith. Lia, Summer, Kimberly, and Kaitlyn, like all of our young people, you are not the future of the church, but its present. The Apostle Paul reminds us that “…in Christ Jesus you are all children of God through faith…There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus.”

Far too many churches have tried to shape their young people to fit what the adults think church ought to be, rather than seeking to acknowledge and embrace what God is blessing in their midst in and through both their young and old, their youngest and their most senior. This struggle is also our struggle. And it is the Holy Spirit that gives us the courage and the vision to imagine a different way to be church and then seek to live into that vision.

'In the last days it will be, God declares,
       that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh,
       and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy,
       and your young men shall see visions,
       and your old men shall dream dreams.

Lia, Summer, Kimberly, and Kaitlyn,  Trinity Lutheran, the faith community of which you are a part is not all that it will be – the work of the Spirit continues as it must until the day of our Lord. Help us to discern what God is blessing in our midst, challenge us to embrace that work, bring your own gifts, your passions, your creativity, your hope to the work in which we all share for the sake of the Gospel. Confirmation is our acknowledgment to you with all humility that we need you for all that God is calling us to do and to be.

My friends, I now turn to all: Christ is risen and the victory is already won!
Do you believe that to be true?
Do you believe it with your whole heart – with all of your being, more than you believe anything else in this world?

We believe it by living it, plain and simple.
And that is not something that we can do on our own, is it? No, we need the Holy Spirit in the fullness of its power at its most audacious; its most creative.

But, the Holy Spirit is not a breakfast cereal. It is not the same with every spoonful. We do not know what we are getting with every bite. It is always in motion; constantly changing and inviting us to change; surprising us and inviting us to embrace the surprises; inviting us to a deeper trust in God and an openness to all that has done, is doing, and will do; inviting us, and this is key, to embrace what God is already blessing and that takes discernment, a real seeking after the Spirit, asking “Where have we seen God already at work?”

Christ is risen and the victory is already won.
Say it with me: Christ is risen and the victory is already won.
Then let our prayer always be: come Holy Spirit, come.
Amen!
***REMINDER***
THIS SUNDAY MAY 27th
CONFIRMATION ONE SERVICE AT 10AM


JUNE 3rd 
10AM BIBLE STUDY  in CHARTER HALL/HS+ CLASS IN MM HALL
11AM SEMI ANNUAL CONGREGATIONAL MEETING DURING WORSHIP - ONE SERVICE.
12:15PM VBS STAFF AND PLANNING FOR YOUTH AND ADULTS
JUNE 10th
10AM BIBLE STUDY  in CHARTER HALL/HS+ CLASS IN MM HALL
11AM WORSHIP - ONE SERVICE.
12:15PM CHINESE AUCTION
JUNE 17th
10AM BIBLE STUDY  in CHARTER HALL/HS+ CLASS IN MM HALL
11AM WORSHIP - ONE SERVICE
JUNE 24th
HS+ and Adult Bible Study time TBD
10AM FAMILY SERVICE in CHARTER HALL
11AM REGULAR SERVICE in the SANCTUARY with Healthy Coffee Hour
(The June 24th schedule will be our regular schedule throughout the summer)

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott


The readings for Sunday, May 27, 2012:


First Reading: Acts 2:1-21

First Reading (Alt.): Ezekiel 37:1-14

Psalm: Psalm 104:25-35, 37 (Psalm 104:24-34, 35b NRSV)

Second Reading: Romans 8:22-27

Second Reading (Alt.): Acts 2:1-21

Gospel: John 15:26-27; 16:4b-15

Ah, the liturgical year cycles back to the feast of Pentecost. It really should be the second most important festival of the church year, second only to Easter, but I suspect that many churches pay more attention to Christmas than to either of the other two festivals. I've talked to many a Christian who didn't know the first thing about Pentecost.

Maybe we're afraid of some of the more, well, pentecostal elements of the holiday: the speaking in tongues (but in languages that could be understood by native speakers), the rushing wind, the fire. Maybe we're feeling overwhelmed by the example set by that first generation of believers.

Maybe you're having more of a dry bones year than a Spirit seared year. Maybe you've been having a dry bones decade. It might be hard for you to believe that Holy Spirit or no Holy Spirit, any flesh can be hung back on a dried out frame.

Maybe you've been whipped by so many winds that you don't know which way to turn. Maybe it's hard for you to hear the breath of God with the howling of so many other winds in your life.

Maybe you feel scorched by circumstances. Maybe you're looking at your desert of a life and thinking that you could use some water.

Often in nature, we see that it takes an unusual event, like a fire or a storm, to invigorate a landscape. We look at the immediate aftermath and see a moonscape that looks forever barren. Yet if we came back in a few years, we'd be amazed by how much new growth we'd see. And that new growth would have never gotten a chance without the calamitous, clearing event.

We often celebrate Pentecost as the birthday of the Church, but we often fail to mention that this birthing, with all its pain and messiness, is an ongoing process. We tend to look back at the early days of the Church with idealistic vision, but if we carefully reread the letters of Paul, we see that those churches had just as many problems as our current churches. We tend to see ourselves as deficient, but we don't have the longer view.

On this festival day, revel in the promise of renewal that God offers. Be alert for new visions and different directions. Trust that dessicated ruins--whether that be our lives, our Church, our neighborhoods, our planet--can be reinvigorated.

Wednesday, May 23, 2012


Trinity’s Budget/Spending Plan Schedule       
May 17th 7PM Council meets to approve draft Budget
May 24th 7PM Draft Budget Presentation to the congregation
               in Charter Hall followed by discussion.*
*if you need transportation to the budget presentation please contact the office ASAP
May 24th 8PM Council meetings to finalize 2012-2013 Budget
May 27th   Proposed 2012-2013 Budget available at worship and sent out via email to the congregation
June 3rd    11AM Budget Vote during the semi-annual congregational meeting held during worship.

Tuesday, May 22, 2012


SUMMER Grace Groups
ACTS 2:42
They devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.

Hosts volunteer their homes, provide plates/tableware, and lead prayer/Scripture reflection for a total of 8 people including themselves. The other guests sign up to bring the different parts of the meal to share with those eight (Main course, sides, Salad, Drinks, Dessert)

Pastor Keith will provide the host with an easy Scripture discussion for after dinner time and suggestions for shared prayer. The host is asked to sign up ONE TIME for a date/time for dinner during to be held some time during the months of July or August.

Once the host sign up is complete, we will confirm with the hosts then open up the signups for those who desire to participate as guests.

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN SERVING AS A HOST PLEASE CHECK THE BLOCK ON YOUR WORSHIP SLIP
Temporary Custodian Needed
We are looking for someone to fill in as custodian while our regular custodian takes vacation July 1st - 20th.  10 hours a a week for 3 weeks at $9 an hour. Please check the box on your worship slip or let Pastor Keith know. Once the Personnel Committee makes a decision all those applying will be notified.

Sunday, May 20, 2012

TRINITY IN ONE WORD
Trinity Lutheran described in one word by worshippers writing on their worship slips and accumulating such words this spring placed into a "Wordle"

Thursday, May 17, 2012


REFLECTING ON OUR FAITH
Share and edited for anonymity and clarity from Trinity's weekly worship slips Based upon people's experiences in the past week. We share a sampling of these in our weekly BLOG to encourage others in their walk with God. 

1. Where have you seen God working this week?
In the thousands of people that attended the BOLD Justice  action
In BOLD Justice and those impacted by autism.
In my Trinity Family
In answering prayers
In my ladies Bible Study
At Bible Study.
At the recovery Bible Study.
In the birth of my great grandson Ryan.
My son’s acts of kindness.
Everywhere.
In the blessing of my kids.
In the reconciliation of our daughter and grand daughter.
In my life and family.
In retired people.
Jubilee Center Fundraiser.
In having my base needs met.
Answering Prayers.
In a new life given to someone and a changed life glorifying God.
 
2. Where Did God use someone else to bless you this week (whether they knew it or not?)
The Ladies that I met at the God Spa Retreat – a source of inspiration.
In sharing their story with me.
The women travelling with me to God Spa.
With hugs
At home with a friend.
Putting my son in my life.
Feeling the love of friends who took time to connect with me.
My prayer partner.
My daughter sent flowers.
God used my family to bless me.
In a child returning home.
In prayer to heal pain on the inside.
My new friends.
Providing friendship and discussion about God and a ride.

3. Where did God use you to bless someone else this week?
In my work.
As a supportive and loving sister to my sister in Christ
Smiling and sharing the Word.
Praying and meditation at a meeting this week.
Made calls to shut-ins.
By sharing God’s blessing with my fellow brothers.
By giving.
Able to pick up my grand daughter and boy friend and bring them to their mothers.
Spoke to someone at the senior center about Jesus.
Helped someone who was sick.
God used me to bless my family!
By sharing my experience, strength and hope.
In helping someone obtain a wheelchair ramp.
Sharing about journaling and speaking from the heart.
Our Christian rock band “Ultreya” in our gig Saturday night.
 
How has Trinity helped to sustain you in your following of Christ in the world?
In too many ways to name.
Just letting me know that they are there and supportive.
Hearing the word.
Through opportunities to participate by giving to the community.
Daily.
By consistently being there.
Pastor’s sermon and Bible study.
Walking by faith and not by sight.
Everywhere.
Just helping me to stay grounded in Christ
By helping me stay connected to the true vine.
By listening to the word of God and accepting God’s love for me, I’m able to bear good fruit.

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel


by Kristin Berkey-Abbott

The readings for Sunday, May 21, 2012:

First Reading: Acts 1:15-17, 21-26

Psalm: Psalm 1

Second Reading: 1 John 5:9-13

Gospel: John 17:6-19

In today’s Gospel passage, we see Jesus close to the end of his mission. We get to watch him pray. And notice that Jesus prays for those people whom he has called to continue the work he has set in motion.

This passage reminds us that we are sanctified consecrated, and sent out into the world. The not yet message of the Gospel reminds us that we have work to do And this Gospel passage reminds us of the stakes: Jesus prays that we will be protected from the evil one.

In many ways, our most basic task is to confront evil. Everything we do, everything we create, needs to be a challenge to evil. We are not to go through the world with our business as usual selves. We are not to have a self that we bring out on Sundays, in church, and our week day self, and our Saturday self. Our task is to live an integrated life, a life that lets the light of the Good News shine through us and our actions.

The thought of living an integrated life can drive some of us to distraction. How can we be sure that we are? Some of us are so distracted that we never really make the attempt.

As humans, we have a tendency to make these things more complicated than they need to be. Here again, as he so often does, Christ shows us a path towards a life of integrity.

We can pray. We are to care for everyone. We can start by praying for them.

We can begin with the easy prayers: the ones for our families and friends. And then we can move on to the difficult people. You say you have a boss who is driving you crazy, making you redo work 5 times, only to arrive back at the place you started? You could growl and grumble. But you'd use your time far more wisely by praying for your boss. Your neighbors play their music too loud and fight through the night? Pray for them. You disagree with your leaders? Pray for them. As you drive home, let yourself notice the homeless people, the ones who wait for the bus, the teenagers who look to be loitering with no place to go. Pray for them.

As you move through the day, be on the lookout for ways to be the yeast in the bread, the salt that flavors the soup. Look for ways to show Christ's love. You can do it quietly--in fact, there are plenty of Gospel passages that say you must do it quietly. You don't want to be that pious Christian that makes people feel squirmy; you don't want people to accuse you of being a typical hypocritical Christian on the days when your light flickers and dims. Radiate love, as often as you can, and you will be a far stronger advocate for God, and a person who is far better equipped to fight evil.

Each day, pray the prayer that Jesus prayed so long ago, that his joy may be fulfilled in you (verse 13). Each day, look for ways to bring that joy to others. Each day, work for beauty and peace and the defeat of evil.

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

OUR WEEKLY WORDLE!
Trinity Lutheran described in one word by worshippers writing on their worship slips and accumulating such words this spring placed into a "Wordle"

Sunday, May 13, 2012

Saturday, May 12, 2012


Sermon on JOHN 15 9-17

This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you.

In the last night before his betrayal, arrest, crucifixion and death, one could argue that this giving of the commandment to love is in the Gospel of John, the culmination of all that Jesus has come in the world to teach.

Love one another as I have loved you.

Not the Golden Rule. Not do unto others as you would have them do unto you. But rather:

Love one another as I have loved you.

For the observant Jew there are 613 commandments in their Scriptures that they are called to follow. On the other hand, when we hear the word “Commandment” we might think of the Ten Commandments given to Moses on Mount Sinai; the Ten that perhaps we once memorized as children, one at a time, with our name on a chart and little Gold stars next to our names as each one became part of our memory, if not our life. (1) Thou shalt have no other gods. (2) Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord, thy God, in vain. (3) Thou shalt sanctify the holy-day. (4) Thou shalt honor thy father and thy mother (5) Thou shalt not kill. We should fear and love God that we may not hurt nor harm our neighbor in his body, but help and befriend him in every bodily need (6) Thou shalt not commit adultery. (7) Thou shalt not steal. (8) Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor. (9) Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house. (10) Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife, nor his man-servant, nor his maid-servant, nor his cattle, nor anything that is his.

So, what do we make of this new commandment, now nearly 2,000 years old? Does it replace the old ones? Does it become the 11th (or by another reckoning, the 614th commandment?).  What do we make of it? Everything was well and good, wasn’t it? With the Ten Commandments we knew what we were supposed to do and not do. Love the Lord. Don’t kill. Don’t covet. Honor our parents. And so on. And then along comes Jesus with the command to love and not just love but to love as Jesus has loved us.

The challenge before us today is not to see this as one commandment among several or even among many, but rather that with these words Jesus interprets our very lives as Christians through how we embody his command to love, how we have lived it out. In his words and actions, Jesus declares this commandment the one by which and through which all we say and do in this life will be reckoned.

Love one another as I have loved you.

This command has significant and undeniable meaning for us. It means that we do not get to hide behind convenient passages of scripture that when taken out of context defend our own failure to embody this commandment and even worse, support and defend its opposite. This has been the pattern of behavior by some Christians for much of Christian history. Evil in all of its manifestation  has been perpetuated upon entire groups of people in the name of Jesus. We have to own that. It is part of story into which our own lives have been written. We have to own that and at the same time we must allow Jesus’ commandment to love to own us. To renew us. To transform our way of being in the world.

Let the true measure of our faith not be that we have looked upon our neighbor and found fault, found weakness, found differences, but rather  that we have in Jesus’ words, found the greater love, in laying our own life down for theirs.

“No one has greater love than this,” says Jesus, than “to lay down one's life for one's friends.”

Nearly five hundred years ago, when Martin Luther was writing the Small Catechism, the transforming power of Jesus’ command to love showed itself in the way in which Luther took the negative commandments – the “thou Shall not” commandments – and offered in his explanation of their meaning actions that embodied this love.

So the commandment not to kill takes on the added action of helping and befriending our neighbor

The commandment not to covet our neighbor’s house takes on the added responsibility of helping them and being of service to them in maintaining it.  

So the commandment not to bear false witness takes on the added responsibility of defend our neighbor, thinking  and speaking well of them, and put the best construction on everything that they say and do.

Consistent with Luther’s teaching and embodying the commandment to love, it is not sufficient to merely not kill, not steal, not covet, not to cheat on one’s spouse, but in their fullness these commandments invite us to action in the world for the sake of someone else, whether that person is our neighbor, our spouse or a stranger.

A life of love as Jesus would have us live it is so much more than live and let live or do no harm. It is active. It is engaged in the world and for the welfare of others. It is love incarnate. A laying down of one’s life for the sake of the other.  And let us recall that when Jesus was pressed to answer the question: “And who is my neighbor” he did not answer with a tape measure in hand, by proximity, how close they lived to you or how well you knew them, but by erasing limits, tearing up old ideas, and showing that our neighbor is the one in need. And so our neighbor is everyone, my friends. Anyone. 

Where will find the strength, the wisdom, the passion to love by laying down our life for another’s life? To love another as Jesus loves us? Luther tells us that it comes through faith: 
“Faith, Luther says, “is God's work in us, that changes us and gives new birth from God…” He declares that “It changes our hearts, our spirits, our thoughts and all our powers. It brings the Holy Spirit with it. Yes, it is a living, creative, active and powerful thing, this  faith. Faith cannot help doing good works constantly. It doesn't stop to ask if good works ought to be done, but before anyone asks, it already has done them and continues to do them without  ceasing.”
 
Faith enough to love as Jesus invites us to love, commands us to love, shows us to love in and through his very life, God gives to us. Not for some, nor to only a special few, but for all. 
 
The question is: Are we willing to trust God enough to lay down our life in order to live to love as Jesus loves?
 
Are we willing to trust God enough to lay down our life in order to live to love as Jesus loves? AMEN!
THE HOLY LAND EXPERIENCE
Trinity is planning a one day trip to the "Holy Land Experience" in Orlando on Friday July 13th. If we can put together a group of 10 or more the cost will be Adults $35, youth (6-18) $20, and children (3-5) $10. Please let us know by responding here or on your worship slip or by letting Piper Spencer or Kathy Furey know. Car pools will be arranged. http://www.holylandexperience.com/

Trinity’s Budget/Spending Plan Schedule       
May 17th 7PM Council meets to approve draft Budget
May 24th 7PM Draft Budget Presentation to the congregation
               in Charter Hall followed by discussion.*
*if you need transportation to the budget presentation please check the block on your worship slip
May 24th 8PM Council meetings to finalize 2012-2013 Budget
May 27th   Proposed 2012-2013 Budget available at worship and sent out via email to the congregation
June 3rd    11AM Budget Vote during the semi-annual congregational meeting held during worship.

SUMMER SCHEDULE

MAY 27th
CONFIRMATION ONE SERVICE AT 10AM

JUNE 3rd 
10AM BIBLE STUDY  in CHARTER HALL/HS+ CLASS IN MM HALL
11AM SEMI ANNUAL CONGREGATIONAL MEETING DURING WORSHIP - ONE SERVICE.
12:15PM VBS STAFF AND PLANNING FOR YOUTH AND ADULTS

JUNE 10th
10AM BIBLE STUDY  in CHARTER HALL/HS+ CLASS IN MM HALL
11AM WORSHIP - ONE SERVICE.
12:15PM CHINESE AUCTION

JUNE 17th
10AM BIBLE STUDY  in CHARTER HALL/HS+ CLASS IN MM HALL
11AM WORSHIP - ONE SERVICE

JUNE 24th
9AM BIBLE STUDY in CHARTER HALL/HS+ CLASS IN MM HALL
10AM FAMILY SERVICE in CHARTER HALL
11AM REGULAR SERVICE in the SANCTUARY with Healthy Coffee Hour
(The June 24th schedule will be our regular schedule throughout the summer)

Wednesday, May 09, 2012

WHAT IS TRINITY?
Trinity Lutheran described in one word by worshippers writing on their worship slips and accumulating such words this spring placed into a "Wordle"
Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott



The readings for Sunday, May 13, 2012:


Acts 10:44-48

Psalm 98
1 John 5:1-6

John 15:9-17

This week's Gospel continues where last week's lessons about the vine and the branches left off. Notice how many times Jesus commands us to love each other.

Yet most elements of Western culture encourage us to put ourselves first, to keep ourselves isolated. But Christ calls us to a different kind of life. In Eat this Book, Eugene H. Peterson says, ". . . the words of Scripture can no longer be handled by means of definition, 'who is my neighbor?' The text insists on participation, 'will you be a neighbor?' Jesus insists on participation. Jesus dismisses the scholar with a command, 'Go and do . . .' Live what you read. We read the Bible in order to live the word of God" (84).

Again and again, Jesus tells us to love each other. He knows how much we need each other’s love. As a church, we don't devote a whole Sunday to Jesus' Ascension into Heaven and in a way, that's a shame. It would be a perfect opportunity to remind ourselves that Jesus leaves his mission in our hands. We are the ones who must work towards concrete actions in the physical realm. In today's Bible reading, Jesus makes it clear that we're his equals. He calls us friends. We are to go forth and bear fruit.

On this Mother’s Day, as we read the Gospel, we might see Jesus as the ultimate mother. Jesus nourishes us by giving us his own body. But Jesus doesn’t nourish us just to keep us close and smothered and dependent. Like any good parent, Jesus nourishes us and trains us so that we’re ready to leave the nest, ready to be resurrection people shining light into a darkening and desperate world.

You may not be feeling like you’re in a loving space right now. Pretend that you are. Make the effort that it takes not to snap at your troublesome colleague. Pray for the people that annoy you. Leave love notes for your family members. Say please and thank you more often.

Here, too, on Mother’s Day, we can look at the mothers who are doing a good job and try to emulate them. Tell people that they’ve done a good job when they have. Thank people for doing their chores. Remind people that they need to use their words, and not in their angry voices. Say please and thank you more often, and apologize when you’ve not done your best. Look for ways to make play dates with God and with the world.

You will likely find yourself transformed by your own actions—and hopefully, you’ll find the world transforming around you in response to your loving kindness.

Receive replenishment from Christ so that your withered branch will once again bear fruit. Allow yourself to be transformed into the part of the plant that sustains life.

Wednesday, May 02, 2012

Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott


The readings for Sunday, May 6, 2012:



First Reading: Acts 8:26-40

Psalm: Psalm 22:24-30 (Psalm 22:25-31 NRSV)

Second Reading: 1 John 4:7-21

Gospel: John 15:1-8


Again, we have a Gospel lesson with a metaphor that's so familiar that we might be tempted to doze off. Vine, branches, got it. But look again, closely at several verses. I find this Gospel a bit unsettling.

Notice how in just 8 verses, Jesus repeats several things. More than once, we're reminded that branches that don't bear fruit are cut away from the true vine. Look at the verbs that Jesus uses for these non-bearing branches: wither, gathered, thrown, burned.

My brain wants to know what kind of timeline we're working with here. How long do I have to prove I can bear fruit? Is it too late? Have I been cast into the fire already, and I just don't know it yet?

I suspect I'm missing the point. God, the true vine and vinedresser, seems to give humanity chance after chance after chance. In these verses, though, Jesus reminds us that much is expected from us. We might ask ourselves in what areas of our lives we're bearing fruit. What needs to be pruned away?

Maybe you're feeling fairly withered, even though you don't see yourself as being cut off from Christ. If that feeling persists, perhaps it's time to consider doing something differently. Maybe you need to pray more. Maybe you need to withdraw and take a retreat. Maybe you need to do some social justice work. Maybe you need some sort of midweek class or worship activity. Maybe you need to walk a labyrinth and meditate.

This week's Gospel makes clear that we are not put in place to just sprout meekly. We are to bear much fruit. If we feel like we're withering, we shouldn't let that feeling persist for too many months before we consider how we're going to become more fruitful.

Congregations will hear this Gospel this week, and many will consider what this verse means. Are we to bring more members to church? Are we to go out and create some sort of intentional community? Should we do more vigorous work for social justice? How can we be light and leaven in our workplaces?

The answers to all these questions might be yes. Or perhaps no. Let's return to the vine metaphor, and let's think about wine. Those of us who drink a variety of wines know that even though wines are made from grapes, there are lots of different grapes, with very different characters, which make a wide variety of wines possible.

Some of us are the type of grape who can go out and invite all our friends to church. Others of us are the kind of grape that would prefer to pray for others in private. Some of us might be the kind of grape who can visit sick parishioners, at home or in the hospital. Some of us might be called to create intentional community, while others of us have already found the community which can nurture us.

There is no single right or wrong answer. But we need to make sure we're asking the right questions. One time at a retreat, as I talked to a pastor friend about work issues, she asked, "But through your work, are you creating a thing of beauty?" That's one of the interesting questions.

We also need to consider whether or not our daily activities are working on behalf of good or evil. Every action that we take helps to create a world that is either more good or more evil. We want to make sure we're creating the Kingdom that God has called us to help create. We're to be creating it here, now--not in some distant time and place when we're dead.

We're in a world where the Good News of the Gospel is that the Kingdom of God is both here now (thus a cause for joy) and not yet (as evidenced by evil in the world). Everything we create needs to be a challenge to evil.

We don't have time to waste withering on the vine. God has many joyous tasks for us, and the world urgently needs for us to do them.

Tuesday, May 01, 2012


MULTICULTURALFEST THANK YOU!
A SHOUT OUT to everyone who joined us as we sampled awesome foods from around the world! It took many hands and recipes - so much appreciation goes out to all who played a part in the success from those who helped set up, clean up, serve, share food samples, bought a ticket or participated some other way. Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!
MOTHER DAUGHTER BANQUET UPDATETrinity's Annual Mother-Daughter Banquet "Mayday Celebration" will take place on Friday, May 11th at 6:30PM in Trinity's Charter Hall. Cost is $12.00 for adults and older children; 10 and under $6.00; children under 3 free. Menu includes Chicken Francese with lemon sauce, Mixed veggies, yellow rice, salad, rolls, strawberry cake. Coffee, tea, and Punch. Tickets are onsale through this Sunday May 6th - see Earline LaCroix or SAM.
ALSO:
Setup helpers needed Thursday May 10th at 6:30PM