WORSHIP WITH US!
8:30AM, 9:45AM in the hall, or 11AM

Location:
7150 Pines Blvd
Pembroke Pines, FL 33024
The SE corner of Pines Blvd and 72nd Ave
Across the street from Broward college South Campus lake
(954) 989-1903
tlcppines@gmail.com


Join Us For Worship!

Join Us For Worship!
Sundays at 8:30AM, 9:45AM, and 11AM

Featured Post

Advent Meditation on Joseph

The reading for Sunday, December 17, 2017: Matthew 1:18-25 This Sunday we read about an angel appearing to Joseph in a dream. We've no...

Friday, February 28, 2014

TRANSFIGURATION SUNDAY SERMON MARCH 2, 2014


TRANSFIGURATION SUNDAY SERMON MARCH 2, 2014
The Rev. Dr. Keith A. Spencer
Trinity Lutheran Church, Pembroke Pines, FL

And so we arrive at Transfiguration Sunday, astride the divide between the Seasons of Epiphany and Lent; Christmas now far in the rear-view mirror and Easter coming fast upon the horizon.  And it seems that everywhere we look we see mountains in those seasons and the stories that fill them.  Today it is Jesus, Peter, James and John there on the mountaintop joined by powerful and holy figures from Israel’s past: Moses the law giver and Elijah, the prophet par excellence.
“It is good Lord to be here,” says Peter.

Here on the mountaintop. Here as compared, one supposes to “there,” with there being everywhere else. “There” meaning life in all of its brokenness, its complications, its messiness; all that reality, it seems, setting up roadblocks in front of our desire to be with God, to draw nearer to God, to find peace in and with God. Who would want to be “there” when one could be “here?”
“It is good Lord to be here,” says Peter.

And it is good to be here. For us to be here together. To be here knowing in our heart of hearts that the Lord has promised to be here with us as we gather in Jesus’ name.  To be present in our communion with one another in fellowship. Our communion at the Lord’s Table. Our communion as the word of God washes over us and the Holy Spirit opens our hearts and minds and speaks to our souls of the love and grace of God, of the hope that we share together in and through Christ Jesus, our Lord.
It is good Lord to be here.

And here, nearly 166 months ago I asked a group of adults on my very first Sunday “What is church?” Here gathered under the towering mahogany tree in front of Charter Hall as we sat on the benches and a few assorted steel-grey folding chairs and began to feel one another out, I asked my first question: What is church? Eyes flicked left and right pondering the question. Hmmmm. “What is church?”  “What is church?”
And nearly all of the responses, when they came, were place responses.
Church is the place where I worship.
Church is the place where I spend time with God.
Church is the place where I find peace and renewal.

 “It is good Lord to be here,” says Peter. Here in this place. Here with you Jesus and Moses and Elijah. Oh, and here with these other guys standing behind me, James and John. It’s all good.  Peter overwhelmed to be at that place at that time with all of those people. His heart full, overflowing. Himself amazed.
And Peter doesn’t leave it there  - he goes on to suggest that he build some dwelling places for the big three – I guess he figures he and James and John can just sleep out under the stars. It is so good to be there that Peter wants to dwell there. Let the present moment stretch out into the future, into infinity. Let the present moment move beyond words to become his all in all.
Perhaps we can sympathize with Peter.

One year when I was a teenager church became for me such a place of peace and joy that I attended three straight Christmas Eve services.  I wanted to dwell in that place and in that moment forever. The incarnation, God in Christ Jesus coming into the world in the flesh, was so powerful that everything else just fell away in comparison. The feeling was electric – as if joy was the very air, hope refreshed with every breath.
Like those adults in my first Bible Study class, that night if anyone cared to ask me, dared to ask me, I, too, would have answered that -
Church is the place where I worship
Church is the place where I spend time with God
Church is the place where I find peace and renewal.

But in time as the years and experiences shaped my faith something shattered those images for me. Broke them utterly.

Beyond the help of Elmer’s glue and gorilla glue or even crazy glue -

They were that broken. Broken like the world imagined by the Old Testament prophet Isaiah where:

Every valley shall be lifted up,
and every mountain and hill be made low;
the uneven ground shall become level,
and the rough places a plain.


They were that broken. Broken like the world imagined by John the Baptist preparing the way for Jesus when he sees as one in which:

Every valley shall be filled,
and every mountain and hill shall be made low,
and the crooked shall be made straight,
and the rough ways made smooth;
and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.


Christ Jesus is not calling us to find him on the mountaintops. In Christ Jesus the mountains aren’t getting higher, aren’t remaining unchanged, but are coming down to meet us and we riding the roads and valleys are being raised up to meet him.

In this new life we have and share in and through Christ that Isaiah portends and John the Baptist declares imminent we find ourselves challenged:

What if Church is not the only and best answer as to the place where we worship; not the only and best answer as to the place where we spend our time with God; not the only and best answer as to the place where we will find peace and renewal?

If we see church as a place, as that mountaintop then that is certainly true. Church as the mountaintop will never be the best answer to the key questions that we must ask of ourselves as Christians.

But what if the Church is more?
What if the Church isn’t a place, but a movement? Not a mountaintop but a mission? Then wouldn’t we experience God, our deeply incarnational and relational God, in and among the very people who are not here? In Scripture Jesus tells us and shows us that the greatest commandments are to love God and to love neighbor – by this Jesus says people will know that we are his disciples if we have love for one another. Since we are commanded to go and love in Jesus’ name then we now face the immediate challenge that we can’t engage people with the love of Jesus and the Gospel that bears it and declares it, if we do not know them. That beyond the four walls of this building, out in this community in which God has placed us and calls us to live out our faith, we do not know the people. To love them in Christ’s name we must seek them and engage them and be engaged by them and learn their names, their lives, their loves, their all.
As the mountains come down and the valleys are raised up and we find ourselves primarily not inside a building but on a road made smooth by the grace and love of God will we choose to be that church so that all flesh might see the salvation of God because of the way we choose to be church?  For this, my friends, is a choice before us. Perhaps the choice before us: Will we be such a church? Such a movement? Such a mission?  
Amen.

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Matthew 9:37-38


What we need to be asking of the Lord...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/matthew-937-38.html

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Matthew 5:6


Hungering...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/matthew-56_26.html

WORSHIP TOGETHER


WORSHIP TOGETHER
Intentionally different – Faithfully done!
Sundays at 9:45AM in Charter Hall

 “Worship Together” is our Cross+Generational blend of Worship, Sunday school, and Family Faith formation that focuses on teaching key Bible stories and equipping people to connect the scriptures with their everyday lives by engaging them in a variety of creative ways. The stories are prayed, sung, signed using American Sign Language, shared through dramatic readings and puppet shows, and engaged and expressed through other creative fine arts and media. It has both a large group and small group component in which the “Faith Five” practices of sharing highs and lows, engaging scripture, connecting scripture with what’s going on in one’s life, praying for one another and sharing a word of blessing are used. Holy Communion is always shared and all of the generations are made to feel welcome and equal partners in all that we do. This service takes place in the fellowship hall. This service is not just for families with children, but for anyone and everyone who would find its experiential, participatory, interactive and communal model appealing.

FEB 2nd and 9thThe Great Flood” Genesis 9:13-14
FEB 16th and 23rdAbraham’s Call” Genesis 15:5
MAR 2nd and 9thSacrifice of Isaac”  Genesis 22:7-8 
MAR 16th and 23rdJacob’s Ladder” Genesis 28:11-13
MAR 30th and APR 6thJoseph’s Coat” Genesis 50:20
APR 13th PALM SUNDAY
APR 27th  LOOKING BACK UPON EASTER

Worship Matters


WORSHIP
SUNDAY MORNING
9:45AM CROSS+GEN in Charter Hall
11AM Worship in the Sanctuary

NEW for this LENT: Saturday Evening Communion Service at 5:05PM in the Sanctuary beginning SAT MARCH 8th

 ASH WEDNESDAY – March 5th
7AM Imposition of Ashes
NOON Imposition of Ashes with Holy Communion
7:15PM Pre-Service Music
7:30PM Imposition of Ashes with Holy Communion
ASH WED PANCAKE SUPPER 6PM to 7:30PM
$3.50 a person and $12 max per family

SUNDAYS IN LENT 11AM
JESUS’ “LAST WEEK” ACCORDING TO THE GOSPEL OF MARK
*The new SATURDAY evening 5:05PM communion service will use the same texts
MARCH 9th   1st Sunday in Lent
Monday of HOLY WEEK          Mark 11:12-19

March 16th  2nd Sunday in Lent
TUESDAY OF HOLY WEEK        MARK 11:20-13:37*

March 23rd 3rd Sunday in Lent
WEDNESDAY OF HOLY WEEK  MARK 14:1-11

March 30th 4th Sunday in Lent
THURSDAY OF HOLY WEEK     MARK 14:12-72*

APRIL 6th 5th SUNDAY IN LENT 
FRIDAY OF HOLY WEEK             MARK 15*
* A selection from each reading will be used on these days.

CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS


CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS

MARCH
2nd       Justice Ministry Network Members Commissioning 
2nd       Pastor Keith’s Sabbatical Ends/Beignet-A-Palooza!
2nd       WELCA Easter Egg orders begin
3rd        BOLD Justice Criminal Justice Comm. Meeting
(7pm @ First Lutheran)
5th        ASH WED (see times in this booklet)
8th        5:05PM Saturday Evening Lenten Contemplative Service  
9th        Easter Lily Envelopes Begin
9th        1st Sunday in Lent

11th      WELCA
15th      5:05PM Saturday Evening Lenten Contemplative Service
18th      BOLD Justice Rally at 7:30PM – St Maurice Catholic Church
22nd     5:05PM Saturday Evening Lenten Contemplative Service
29th      5:05PM Saturday Evening Lenten Contemplative Service

APRIL
3rd        BOLD Justice Nehemiah Action at 7:30PM St Mark’s Catholic
5th        5:05PM Saturday Evening Lenten Contemplative Service
6th        Last Sunday to order WELCA Easter Eggs
8th        WELCA
12th      5:05PM Saturday Evening Lenten Contemplative Service
13th      PALM/PASSION SUNDAY
13th      Last Sunday to order Easter Lilies
17th      MAUNDY THURSDAY          Noon; 7:30PM
18th      GOOD FRIDAY                      Noon; 7:30PM
20th      EASTER SUNDAY  6:30AM, 9:30AM, 11AM
27th      9:45AM Worship Together and 11AM Healing w/Cantata

MAY
9th        6:30PM Mother-Daughter Banquet
11th      Blessing of Mothers/BLOOD DRIVE
13th      WELCA Spring Tea
18th      Blessing of Graduates
22nd     THURS. Budget Presentation Meeting 7PM

JUN
1st       Semi-Annual Congregational Meeting/BUDGET VOTE
8th        Pentecost/Confirmation/Multiculturalfest
10th      WELCA
15th      Marriage Vow Renewal Service/Blessing of Fathers
23rd – 27th Vacation Bible School

Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott

The readings for Sunday, March 2, 2014:

First Reading: Exodus 24:12-18

Psalm: Psalm 2

Psalm (Alt.): Psalm 99

Second Reading: 2 Peter 1:16-21

Gospel: Matthew 17:1-9


Here we are at Transfiguration Sunday again. We celebrate this festival on the Sunday before Ash Wednesday, although the earlier festival day was August 6.

It's such a familiar story that we may feel that we can get nothing new from it.  But it's a story that bears repeating. 

When I read the Gospel again, I'm not surprised by Peter's offer to build booths and celebrate the Transfiguration in a commercial way.  Christ's command to tell no one makes me pause.  Why can't we share this amazing moment?

Christ says this often. Go and tell no one--that seems to be a constant command. And it seems antithetical to the task of the Church.

In just a few months, we'll get a very different  Pentecost message. Aren't we supposed to go and witness? Spread the good news? If Jesus is our role model, what do we make of his command to stay silent?

In some ways, perhaps Jesus knew the times he lived in. He knew that early fame would undo his purpose. He knew that people would focus on the physical plane--"This man can heal my blindness"--but not the spiritual plane, the one where we need healing the most.

He also knew that people who see visions, who catch a glimpse of something otherworldly, are often shunned by the community. What would have happened if James and John and Peter came down from the mountain and proclaimed what they had seen? How would the community have responded?

Jesus knew that he couldn't appear too threatening to the status quo too early. In the verses that follow, the ones not included in this Gospel, Jesus makes clear that persecution follows those who see visions. And that persecution still persists today. Our culture tolerates those of us who pray. It's less tolerant of those of us who claim that God replies to our prayers.

The life of the believer is tough, and one measure of its difficulty is knowing when to speak, and knowing when to hold our tongues. Sometimes we should keep our counsel. Sometimes we should testify verbally. Always we should let our lives be our testimony.

Christ also might have been wary of the human tendency to rush towards transfiguration.  We yearn to be different, but so often, we shun the hard work involved.  We might embrace transformation before we stop to consider the cost.

Like Peter, we might want to turn Christ into Carnival: build booths, charge admission, harness holiness. Jesus reminds us again and again that the true work comes not from telling people what we’ve seen, but by letting what we’ve seen change the way that we live. Our true calling is not to be carnival barker, but to get on with the work of repair and building of the communities in which we find ourselves.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Matthew 25:40


The Least and the Lord...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/matthew-2540.html

Sunday, February 23, 2014

John 15:12


No asterisks, fine print or exceptions of any kind...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/john-1512.html

Saturday, February 22, 2014

1 Peter 1:3-4a


A New Birth; a living hope unfading...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/i-peter-13-4a.html

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Romans 5:1-5


The Gift of Endurance...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/romans-51-5.html

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Luke 19:10



If Jesus this is Jesus' priority, what is ours?
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/luke-1910.html

Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott

The readings for Sunday, February 23, 2014:

First Reading: Leviticus 19:1-2, 9-18

Psalm: Psalm 119:33-40

Second Reading: 1 Corinthians 3:10-11, 16-23

Gospel: Matthew 5:38-48


Turn the other cheek. Give up your coat and your shirt. Walk the second mile. This Sunday we get to texts which have been so misunderstood through the centuries that it’s hard to remember what Jesus was really saying. Jesus was NOT saying to let your abuser batter you day in and day out. Jesus was not instructing us to let evil steamroll right over us. Jesus was not even calling us to pacifism, a stoic acceptance of brutality that will buy us a better condo in Heaven for enduring hell on earth.

No, these are resistance texts. Yes, resistance texts.

These are texts that show us how to resist evil in such a way that evil elements will not turn around and destroy us. Likewise, these are texts that show us how to resist evil in such a way that we don’t become the evil that we are resisting.

It’s important to remember that the culture of Jesus was a vastly different culture. It was a culture based on honor. It was a culture based on social hierarchy. It was also a culture ruled by Romans who were not going to tolerate social unrest, Romans who would not hesitate to slaughter dissenters.

Jesus shows us how to live in this world, how to resist evil without being destroyed by evil. If you want to read the best text on this idea, I recommend Walter Wink’s Engaging the Powers: Discernment and Resistance in a World of Domination. It is one of the best books of theology I’ve ever read, and I’ve read a lot of theology.

Let’s focus on the turning of the other cheek, since this passage is so well known. Notice that Jesus gives specific cheeks in specific order. That’s a detail lost on us, but it wouldn’t have been lost on the people who heard Jesus’ instructions. Walter Wink explains:

“Imagine if I were your assailant and I were to strike a blow with my right fist at your face, which cheek would it land on? It would be the left. It is the wrong cheek in terms of the text we are looking at. Jesus says, 'If anyone strikes you on the right cheek...' I could hit you on the right cheek if I used a left hook, but that would be impossible in Semitic society because the left hand was used only for unclean tasks. You couldn't even gesture with your left hand in public. The only way I could hit you on the right cheek would be with the back of the hand.

Now the back of the hand is not a blow intended to injure. It is a symbolic blow. It is intended to put you back where you belong. It is always from a position of power or superiority. The back of the hand was given by a master to a slave or by a husband to a wife or by a parent to a child or a Roman to a Jew in that period. What Jesus is saying is in effect, 'When someone tries to humiliate you and put you down, back into your social location which is inferior to that person, and turn your other cheek.'

Now in the process of turning in that direction, if you turned your head to the right, I could no longer backhand you. Your nose is now in the way. Furthermore, you can't backhand someone twice. It's like telling a joke a second time. If it doesn't work the first time, it has failed. By turning the other cheek, you are defiantly saying to the master, 'I refuse to be humiliated by you any longer. I am a human being just like you. I am a child of God. You can't put me down even if you have me killed.' This is clearly no way to avoid trouble. The master might have you flogged within an inch of your life, but he will never be able to assert that you have no dignity.”

Wink explains the other elements of the Gospel resistance readings here. It’s a great way to introduce yourself to his work, especially for those of us who aren’t up to reading his multi-volume works on resisting the various powers at work in this world.

For those of you who would sneer at the idea of resistance working in our evil, evil world, I would say that nonviolent resistance can bring mighty social change.

Walter Wink, writing in 1993, notes, “In 1989 alone, there were thirteen nations that underwent non-violent revolutions. All of them successful except one, China. That year 1.7 billion people were engaged in national non-violent revolutions. That is a third of humanity. If you throw in all of the other non-violent revolutions in all the other nations in this century [the 20th], you get the astonishing figure of 3.34 billion people involved in non-violent revolutions. That is two-thirds of the human race. No one can ever again say that non-violence doesn't work. It has been working like crazy. It is time the Christian churches got involved in this revolution because what is happening in the world is that the world itself is discovering the truth of Jesus' teaching, and here we come in the church, bringing up the rear.”  And of course, more lately we can point to a variety of revolutions, in the former Soviet Union and the Middle East, some of which have fairly peacefully gotten rid of dictators who had been in power for decades.

Maybe we are not up for the task of resistance, which can be scary and can lead us to unexpected places. At the very least, we can pray. We can pray for those people who are doing the heavy lifting of resistance. We can pray for those who are transforming their societies for good, whether they live in our country or on the other side of the planet. We can pray for the softening of the hearts of the hard ones. We can pray that we have the wisdom to recognize evil when we see it. We can pray that we have the courage to resist evil in whatever forms it comes to us.

Monday, February 17, 2014

John 1:3b-5


The nature of the light in which we all live
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/john-13b-5.html

Sunday, February 16, 2014

Saturday, February 15, 2014

Romans 12:2


Definitely Different...and Unconforming
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/romans-122.html

Friday, February 14, 2014

Psalm 22:30-31


Remembering for the sake of our children
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/psalm-2230-31.html

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott

The readings for Sunday, February 16, 2014:

First Reading: Deuteronomy 30:15-20

First Reading (Alt.): Sirach 15:15-20

Psalm: Psalm 119:1-8

Second Reading: 1 Corinthians 3:1-9

Gospel: Matthew 5:21-37


Last week's Gospel looks easy in the light of this week's Gospel. Light of the world, salt of the earth: check. We know how to do that: feed the poor, be kind to everyone we meet, clothe the ragged, make sure that the oppressed are taken care of. Not easy, to be sure, but easy compared to this week's Gospel.

This week, Jesus tells us that our inner landscape must match our outer actions. Righteous actions aren't good enough. We must work for purity of heart and brain too.

Everyone I know seems to be wrestling with the same question: how can we live a life of integrity, a life that's in synch with our values? The Gospel gives us some fairly serious instruction along these same lines, as Jesus directs us to be sure that our insides and our outsides match. Apparently our current struggles with living a life that's in balance are not new to our time.

We all know what happens if our lives get out of synch. We become hypocrites, and most of us would say we don't want that.

I could make the argument that the hypocrisy of Christians do more to hurt our Gospel mission than anything else. If you know any non-believers and you ask them why they don't believe, they won't often bring up the fact that belief in God requires a faith beyond their senses, a faith beyond what is scientifically proveable. No, most non-believers will bring up the hypocrisy of Christians, from the smaller hypocrisies, like the Christian who pretends to be a friend to your face but spreads ugly rumors about you, to the huge hypocrisies, like all the sexual predators employed by the Church through the ages. How can they believe in the God of those types of people?

And if you ask the non-churched why they don't go to church, they will almost always bring up hypocrisy. Many outsiders look at churches and wonder why they don't do more with the resources that they have.  Most people know the Gospel message about caring for the poor and dispossessed.  Outsiders wonder why we aren't doing more.

Of course, the secret that I only share with a few people is that quite a few Christians wrestle with these questions too.  In any community, I'd guess that most churches are struggling with basic questions, like how to take care of the building and make the payroll.  I'd guess that most churches in most communities, despite outward appearances, don't have the resources that the unchurched assume that they do.  If we're being very honest, perhaps many members of those churches think the very same thing.

Jesus wants us to be more than surface Christians. It's easy to go to church service each week, to sing the hymns, to hug each other. It's harder to live our Christian values the rest of the week. Go back and reread all of what Jesus tells us to do, both in this Gospel and throughout the Gospel texts. Can we really live like that? We're called to forgive each other more times than we think we can. We're called to make peace with our neighbors before we head to church. We're called to give away our money to those who have less than we do. The world watches to see how we live our lives.

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Psalm 51:10-12


The Longed-For Restoration of Joy
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/psalm-5110-12.html

Monday, February 10, 2014

Psalm 136:3-4


The Wonders and Enduring Love of God...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/psalm-1363-4.html

Sunday, February 09, 2014

Matthew 25:44


Seeing Christ in all...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/matthew-2544.html

Saturday, February 08, 2014

BEIGNET-A-PALOOZA!

BEIGNET-A-PALOOZA! SUNDAY MARCH 2nd IS FAT TUESDAY (early)
Come out at 12:15PM when Pastor Keith
will be frying up and sugaring some beignets
All Welcome - Bring Friends!  
Since Beignets are made for Sharing! 

Colossians 3:12-13


What the holy and beloved wear...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/colossians-312-13.html

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

1 Corinthians 13:1


The language of God and of us...which we far too often fail to learn or speak well.
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/1-corinthians-131.html

Meditation on This Sunday's Gospel

by Kristin Berkey-Abbott

The readings for Sunday, February 9, 2014:

First Reading: Isaiah 58:1-9a [9b-12]

Psalm: Psalm 112:1-9 [10]

Second Reading: 1 Corinthians 2:1-12 [13-16]

Gospel: Matthew 5:13-20


With the Gospel for this Sunday, we get our mission statement from Jesus. We are to be the salt of the earth, the light of the world. It’s an interesting time of the year to contemplate light. If we're perceptive, we can see that we're getting a bit more light each day.  The sun is already further away from the horizon, arcing higher as it makes its passage through the sky each day.  But for many of us, we're not getting enough light; we're ready for summer and the 12 hours of light that grace that season.

Maybe you read the Gospel for Sunday, and you despair.  Maybe you've felt much more like a flickering candle lately. Maybe you yearn for verses about dimly burning wicks and the assurance that God will not extinguish you for your lackluster burning.

Jesus tells us that we are to let our light shine, but he doesn't tell us how hard it will be some days. As a child, I always thought that once the light was lit, the hard part was over. I would just shine and shine and not hide my light under a bushel and not let Satan pfff it out (as that old song goes).

I did not anticipate the days and months I would feel like I had no light at all, no wick to light, no oil left in the lamp.  I did not anticipate the days that I would wish I had a flicker, a guttering flame.

How do we keep our light from going out? I suspect it's in the various disciplines that we adopt to strengthen our spiritual lives: praying, reading the Bible, reading other spiritual literature, fasting, tithing, charitable giving, working for social justice, practicing gratitude, noticing the wonders of the world.

It's important to realize that we can't keep our lights lit if we see this activity as a once-a-week duty. I suspect that even a once-a-day duty isn't enough. We need to develop disciplines that reorient us throughout the day. We need to build in breaks throughout the day to attend to our wicks and lights.

Maybe we could tie these spiritual disciplines to other breaks we must take during our days.  You've probably done this practice at one point in your life:  we could say a prayer of gratitude before we eat.  We could listen to spiritually uplifting books or music during our commutes or workouts.  Many charitable activities force us to keep to a schedule.

It’s important to remember that we are often the only light of Jesus that many people will see throughout the week. How would our attitude and behavior change if we saw our lives through this prism? We are the instruments and tools that God uses to deliver God’s light into the world. How can we make ourselves better at the task?

Some of us think that we need to lead people to Jesus by talking to them about our faith. But our lives and our actions have already done all the talking before we ever open our mouths. Keep that in mind as you interact with people. Let your life do the shining. Be the salt that adds savor to everyone’s surroundings. Glorify God in this way.

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Isaiah 64:6b, 8


Our iniquities shall not claim us...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/isaiah-646b-8.html

Monday, February 03, 2014

Psalm 25:16-17


In our troubles and distress, God turns to heal us...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/psalm-2516-17.html

Sunday, February 02, 2014

Matthew 5:6


Hungering for Righteousness...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/matthew-56.html

Saturday, February 01, 2014

WORSHIP TOGETHER


WORSHIP TOGETHER
Intentionally different – Faithfully done!
Sundays at 9:45AM in Charter Hall

 “Worship Together” is our Cross+Generational blend of Worship, Sunday school, and Family Faith formation that focuses on teaching key Bible stories and equipping people to connect the scriptures with their everyday lives by engaging them in a variety of creative ways. The stories are prayed, sung, signed using American Sign Language, shared through dramatic readings and puppet shows, and engaged and expressed through other creative fine arts and media. It has both a large group and small group component in which the “Faith Five” practices of sharing highs and lows, engaging scripture, connecting scripture with what’s going on in one’s life, praying for one another and sharing a word of blessing are used. Holy Communion is always shared and all of the generations are made to feel welcome and equal partners in all that we do. This service takes place in the fellowship hall. This service is not just for families with children, but for anyone and everyone who would find its experiential, participatory, interactive and communal model appealing.

FEB 2nd and 9th The Great Flood” Genesis 9:13-14
FEB 16th and 23rd Abraham’s Call” Genesis 15:5
MAR 2nd and 9th Sacrifice of Isaac”  Genesis 22:7-8 
MAR 16th and 23rd Jacob’s Ladder” Genesis 28:11-13
MAR 30th and APR 6th Joseph’s Coat” Genesis 50:20
APR 13th PALM SUNDAY
APR 27th  LOOKING BACK UPON EASTER
 

Psalm 84:12


On Trust and Happiness...
http://thelivinggospel.blogspot.com/2014/02/psalm-8412.html